Research Proposal File Is Attached As Well As Images, PLEASE USE!! Use endnotes
Research Proposal File Is Attached As Well As Images, PLEASE USE!! Use endnotes rather than footnotes for this paper. Any text that you cite in the endnotes should also be cited in the bibliography. Endnotes and bibliography should be listed at the end of the paper and do not count as the body of the text. AKA your cover page, endnotes, images, and bibliography do not count towards the page requirement! Please also include illustrations that are identified in the text as fig. 1, fig. 2, etc. and listed with all the information on a separate illustrations list that should come after the endnotes and bibliography. Web References: No web references are permitted unless they are from a peer-reviewed website, the artists’ website, or a primary source. If you are not sure about a website, just ask me! Include Text Listed Below As A Source!! - History of Modern Art, 7th Edition ISBN: 9780205975129 By: Elizabeth C. Mansfield Formatting Details for the Research Paper Length: 9-10 Typed pages Double-spaced (225 words per page), Times New Roman, Font 12. Print must be dark & legible. Structure Title Page (title, your name and date) Text (9-10 pages) Endnotes (1-3 pages) Bibliography (1-3 pages) List of illustrations (1-2 pages). Ex.: Figure 1. Géricault, Raft of the Medusa, 1819. Oil on canvas, 16’ 1” x 23’ 6”, Louvre. Images of each illustration with the following information below: figure number, with artist, title, date of the work, medium, size, and location. Below are examples of how to cite books and articles in the bibliography. Bibliography Examples of books: Bailey, Colin. The Loves of the Gods: Mythological Painting from Watteau to David. New York: Rizzoli, 1992. Crow, Thomas. Emulation. Making Artists for Revolutionary France. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1995. Feldman, Burton, and Robert D. Richardson. The Rise of Modern Mythology 1680-1860. Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 1972. Rosenblum, Robert. Transformations in Late Eighteenth-Century Art. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1967. Examples of articles: Banks, Ada Shadmi. "Two letters from Girodet to Flaxman", The Art Bulletin LXI, no. 1 (1979): 100-101. Johns, Christopher. “Portrait Mythology: Antonio Canova’s Representations of the Bonapartes”, Eighteenth-Century Studies 28 (1994): 115-129. Rubin, James. "Endymion's Dream as a Myth of Romantic Inspiration." Art Quarterly I (Spring, 1978): 47-84. Endnote Formats Below are some examples of how to cite books and articles in endnotes. For additional examples please consult The Chicago Manual of Style (on Reserve in the Main Library) Notes should be double-spaced and in the same format as the text (Times New Roman, 12 font). Examples of books: 1. Robert Herbert, Impressionism: Art, Leisure and Parisian Society (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1988), 10-33. 2. Ibid., 55. 3. Linda Nochlin, The Politics of Vision: Essays on Nineteenth-Century Art and Society (New York: Harper and Row, 1989), 101-103. 4. Herbert, Impressionism, 72-78. Examples of articles: 5. Ada Shadmi Banks, "Two letters from Girodet to Flaxman", The Art Bulletin LXI, no. 1 (1979), 50. 6. Christopher Johns, “Portrait Mythology: Antonio Canova’s Representations of the Bonapartes”, Eighteenth-Century Studies 28 (1994), 115-129. 7. James Rubin, "Endymion's Dream as a Myth of Romantic Inspiration." Art Quarterly I (Spring, 1978), 47-84. Multiple citations of books and articles in the same footnote or endnote: 8. Robert Herbert, Impressionism. Art, Leisure and Parisian Society (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1988), 42; Thomas Crow, The Intelligence of Art (Chapel Hill and London: The University of North Carolina Press, 1999), 81-90; Yvonne Korshak, “Paris and Helen by Jacques-Louis David: Choice and Judgement on the Eve of the French Revolution”, The Art Bulletin (March, 1987), 102-116. Use Ibid. if you are referring to a book or article you just cited in the previous note (see notes 1 and 2 above). Shorten the reference when referring to a book or an article you already cited in an earlier note (see notes 1 and 4 above)

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