*** Please write each discussion post in separate paragraphs numbering them so I
*** Please write each discussion post in separate paragraphs numbering them so I know which response goes with what**** Perhaps you’ve heard the loud *bleep* sound as someone on live television uses profanity. That’s a clear example of censorship. During the daytime, when children are watching and listening, we may agree that this form of censorship is appropriate. After 10 p.m., however, we may find it inappropriate for adult talk shows, for example. Who has the right to decide when—and what—to censor in our mass media? In addition to overt censorship, we may find many subtle forms of censorship in the mass media. We may observe that some stories never get broadcast or published because the sponsors would not be happy, or may stop their purchasing of advertising, which threatens the mass media channel with a loss of revenue. We may see that self-censorship plays a role, and some stories never get covered at all. Finally, we may observe that employees of the mass media tend to go for the headlines, fame, and glory, and chose to ignore other important stories in our communities. Whether it is overt or covert censorship, it can impact us in ways we may not have considered.o prepare for this Discussion: Read the Communication Program Discussion Guidelines. Review “Timeline: 30 Years of Liberating Literature” in this week’s Learning Resources. Read “Censorship in the United States” in this week’s Learning Resources. Read “History of Television Censorship” in this week’s Learning Resources. Read “The Long History of Censorship” in this week’s Learning Resources. Watch “Social Media and Hate Speech: Who Gets to Decide?” in this week’s Learning Resources. 1. Post a response that addresses the following questions: How have our views on censorship changed over time? How do culture and co-cultures play a role in our views on censorship? How can censorship suppress social movements? 2.Freedom of Speech – Where do we draw the line?You are not allowed to yell “Fire!” in a movie theater—it is not protected speech—and yet people can hurl insults at you with almost no fear of prosecution. They are stating their opinion, protected by the First Amendment and free speech. This dilemma raises the critical question: Where do we draw the line? To prepare for this Discussion: Read the Communication Program Discussion Guidelines. Watch Freedom of Speech: Crash Course Government and Politics #25. Watch Freedom of Speech. Read “6 Surprising Exceptions to Freedom of Speech.” Post a response that addresses the following questions: How “free” do you believe your speech is today? How has social media changed the conversation surrounding free speech? What problems does this bring? Should we be doing more, less or the same to regulate speech? Why? Only use the references below please Required Readings American Library Association. (2013). Timeline: 30 years of liberating literature [Multimedia file]. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/timeline Head, T. (2018). Censorship in the United States. ThoughtCo. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/censorship-in-the-united-states-721221 Head, T. (2019). History of television censorship. ThoughtCo. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/history-of-television-censorship-721229 Newth, M. (2010). The long history of censorship. Retrieved from http://www.beaconforfreedom.org/liste.html?tid=415&art_id=475 Nilsson, J. (2017, March 21). 6 surprising exceptions to freedom of speech. The Saturday Evening Post. Retrieved from https://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/2017/03/6-exceptions-to-freedom-of-speech/ Required Media Crash Course [CrashCourse]. (2015, Jul 31). Freedom of speech: Crash course government and politics #25 [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zeeq0qaEaLw Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 7 minutes. History.com. (2019). Freedom of speech [Multimedia file]. Retrieved from https://www.history.com/topics/united-states-constitution/freedom-of-speech Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes. The Atlantic. (2018, August 24). Social media and hate speech: Who gets to decide? [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bghTL5gU6fs Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes. Optional Resources Citron, D. K. (2017). What to do about the emerging threat of censorship creep on the internet [Policy analysis no. 828]. Retrieved from https://www.cato.org/publications/policy-analysis/what-do-about-emerging-threat-censorship-creep-internet?gclid=CjwKCAiA2fjjBRAjEiwAuewS_ZftghL_EKGK5kzZjfx7QPd_vfN_b92fFKyldwLLes9BnbvPmihWiRoC388QAvD_BwE Newton, Casey. (2019). The trauma floor: The secret lives of Facebook moderators in America. Retrieved from https://www.theverge.com/2019/2/25/18229714/cognizant-facebook-content-moderator-interviews-trauma-working-conditions-arizona Communication Program Discussion Guidelines: Do take a stand, express your voice, and support your position with illustrative examples, original ideas, and personal experiences Do examine the question of the week from multiple perspectives Do phrase a misunderstanding or disagreement as a clarifying question Do use “I” statements to personalize your posts and to avoid the appearance of an attack Do not use the word “You” in your response Do not use ALL CAPITAL LETTERS, as it implies you are yelling

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