M1:2 WEEKLY REFLECTION <No unread replies. No replies. <Directions: <<b
M1:2 WEEKLY REFLECTION <
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In the article, “Attitudes and Beliefs about Domestic Violence: Results of a Public Opinion Survey,” an alarming number of survey participants believe that victims of domestic violence are somehow responsible for the abuse that they experience. Other studies have found similar views regarding the issue of sexual assault: http://www.rapecrisisscotland.org.uk/campaigns-projects/not-ever/ (Links to an external site.). <
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Scotland’s “Not Ever” Public Awareness Campaign elucidates this point as seen in its PSA: <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGnGPAZcsqE (Links to an external site.) <
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Discuss the challenges that public opinions of this nature pose to prevention work. In doing so, answer the following questions: How can public opinion surveys (like the examples above) inform prevention efforts? More specifically, what do they tell us about where resources should be allocated, what populations to target and what form(s) of prevention is needed? Why is it, almost forty years after the domestic and sexual violence movement began, that victims are still blamed for their own victimization? <
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In answering these questions, compare domestic violence and sexual assault with the national opioid crisis. In just five years’ time, there have been major attitudinal shifts relative to the topic of opioids. Whereas opioid addiction is now considered a disease, domestic violence and sexual assault is often attributed to “poor choices” on the part of the victim. While characterizations like “junkie” and “addict” have been replaced with terms like “user” or “person with a substance use disorder,” victims of domestic violence are still commonly referred to as “battered women” instead of “survivors.” Why should language matter in prevention? <
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Finally, has the domestic and sexual violence community adequately addressed public perception over the last 40 years? If so, in what ways has it done so? If not, what would you ascribe as reasons for its lack of success? Why do you think that the substance abuse prevention community has been effective in changing attitudes in such a short amount of time? What, can we learn from their efforts, if anything at all? <
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You will be graded on a 21-point scale. <
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*GRADING STRUCTURE: “Excellent” (19-21), “Very Good” (18), “Good” (17), “Needs Improvement” (15-16), “Unsatisfactory” (Below 14), or “Incomplete” (0 point; see Rubric for more details)

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