IN ORDER TO DO THIS WATCH THE MOVIE A Serious Man (2009) AND EXPLAIN BAD FAITH.
IN ORDER TO DO THIS WATCH THE MOVIE A Serious Man (2009) AND EXPLAIN BAD FAITH. CAN BE THROUGH A PERSON ETC. THE MOVIE LINK IS HERE https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lxRY0ni1ZNdYrn58Q5Q3_XmAD6n-QqYz/view MAKE SURE YOU ALSO REFERNCE THE READING I PUT IN THE FILES IF YOU NEED ANOTHER READING LET ME KNOW In the HW: A) Quote once from one of the readings, cite the pg #, and explain the quote--although you probably will quote and paraphrase more than that, the low requirement is to encourage you to discuss, and not repeat back to me, a reading. B) In at least one full paragraph, fully, clearly, and correctly explain one of your philosopher's ideas using and referring to 1-3 course reading(s)--this is key. C) That can be all you aim to do, or, you can spend the rest of the HW responding to it in any way you'd like (connection, criticism, your own example, etc.). This means that this part can include other sources--such as outside readings or movies--but again, you do not have to use a movie, and all sources used must be first approved in your proposal. Length: 5 or more paragraphs (about 7 tends to work best for in-depth discussions) and 1,000 words, not including quotes of full sentences or more. So, based on my experience, it most likely will be about 4 pages in typical font, formatting, etc. Paragraphs must be 4-10 sentences each, not including quotes of full sentences or more. Points will be deducted if there are more quotes than your own words--the point is to write about a reading, not copy and paste from it. You cannot repeat exact words or ideas from a previous HW. Any vague, general, extra, empty, irrelevant, or repetitive sentences will not count toward the length requirement. (E.g., don't put in author bio, background info, or statements such as: "There are a lot of theories about this," or "Some might disagree while others agree.") Other Requirements: Cannot repeat a previous HWs words, ideas, or content (though you may use previously used sources). Focus on one (i.e., main) idea. Explain that idea as fully, clearly, and correctly as possible to the best of your ability. Only give info and ideas relevant to the main idea. Each time you first refer to or start to explain or discuss a new idea, give the paragraph # and/or page # that idea appears on, and be sure it's clear which reading it's from by mentioning the title and author at least once--i.e., cite your sources even when not directly quoting. If you end up getting ideas from outside of the course materials, you must absolutely not hide that fact (which would be academic dishonesty); instead, have integrity and cite those sources as well. All quoted material must have quotation marks around it. Explain all quotes in your own words. Each time you first refer to or start to explain or discuss a new idea, give the page or paragraph # that the idea appears on, and be sure it's clear which reading it's from by mentioning the author at least once. Cite sources even when not directly quoting. If you end up getting ideas from outside of the course materials, you must absolutely not hide that fact (which would be academic dishonesty); instead, have integrity and cite those sources as well, *including all websites*. Use the writing resources and citation/plagiarism help on this page. for readings with page numbers, use (Author, pg. #); for websites use (Author, para. #), if there is >1 work by the same author, also give titles; for videos or podcasts give the time--e.g. (1:15)--and be sure it's clear which source it's from (give title and/or director, and perhaps speaker and/or host);

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